Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Kale Caesar Salad + Seared Artichoke Hearts

This salad is super simple and really delicious, a combination that works right well for us these days. We've been so busy -- like, a no-time-left-for-TMZ, must-schedule-a-full-hour-for-folding-insane-piles-of-laundry, going-to-the-dentist-is-actually-so-relaxing level of busy, you know the drill…but we never want to skimp on mealtime, so we make adjustments. We have stuff to do, but we always have to cook!

One of those fixes is finding stuff we can make ahead, something that'll still be good when we're ready to sit down and eat. As you have likely experienced, most salads wilt into bunch of nothing once they're dressed. This one improves over time and is even better the next day because the kale is so hearty. This is a great new thing to try when you've had your fill of candy kale chips. (A definite possibility. We're there, too.)


Kale Caesar Salad + Seared Artichoke Hearts

1 large head curly kale (stems removed, about 10 cups)
juice of 1 lemon
1 teaspoon grainy mustard (like Zatarain's)
2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 clove garlic (minced)
1 teaspoon vegan/vegetarian worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon honey
1/2 cup grated parmigiano reggiano cheese
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 14-ounce can artichoke heart quarters (in water, drained)
3 cups croutons*

In a large non-reactive glass or plastic bowl, massage the kale with the lemon juice; tear the leaves with your hands until it's in bite-sized pieces. In a small bowl, whisk together the mustard, mayonnaise, garlic, worcestershire, and honey. Add this and half of the parmesan cheese to the kale and toss to incorporate. Allow it to sit covered in the fridge for a couple of hours -- the acid in the lemon will soften the kale. Add salt and pepper to taste once you are ready to serve. Place mixture into a large bowl or divide onto 4 plates.

In a large frying pan over high heat, add the olive oil. Once the oil starts to shimmer, toss in the drained artichoke hearts and cook until browned; turn once. Place warm artichoke hearts onto of the kale, along with the croutons and the remaining cheese. Store any leftovers in an airtight container for up to 3 days. (Makes 4 servings.)

*Make your own croutons by drizzling the bread of your choice with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and placing it into a 250-degree oven until dry and crisp. A French of Italian loaf works well for this, but you can also use a gluten-free bread like we did here. Add extra flavor if you'd like by adding in an Italian herb mix or garlic powder to the bread before toasting.

7 comments:

April said...

I can SO identify with your "going-to-the-dentist-is-actually-so-relaxing" description! With 4 kids of my own, I commented to my dental hygienist how relaxing it was to get my teeth cleaned because for one hour IT WAS ALL ABOUT ME!!! We joked about offering a spa option for the Moms - mani/pedis, the works. As an aside, your salad looks bangin'!

LittleMonsterx14 said...

WOW this looks incredible! yum!

Anonymous said...

Just finished devouring this one for lunch. I couldn't wait a few hours, so it only had about 30 minutes in the fridge. SO DELICIOUS. I've now made a bunch of your recipes, and they're always the best meals in our house. Thank you!

Gail Leinweber said...

This has become one of my go to salads, both for home eating and potlucks. So yummy (and easy!). The only change I've made is to use artichoke bottoms instead of the leafy hearts, which has made it extra awesome.

Greg said...

This looks great, but note that parmesano reggiano is not vegetarian. It is basically always made with animal rennet.

The Chubby Vegetarian said...

Romano may be a good alt. Just check the package for "no animal rennet" or vegetarian. You have to decide for yourself what you will and won't eat and tailor our recipes (or any recipes for that matter) to fit. This food blog is about possibilities, not restrictions. Thanks for checking out our blog!

Marie said...

I had this very conversation with the owner of one of Vancouver's best cheese shops, and she informed me that vegetarian cheeses are made from a enzyme from rennet that is genetically modified...I had no idea!